Pursuing College Athletics

College Athletics Recruiting Guide

  • Steps to Take from Start to Finish
  • Creating a list of Target Schools: NCAA D1 D2 or D3
  • Scholarships vs Merit Aid
  • Testing and Academic Course Load 
  • College Visits and Contact Rules
  • Covid-19 changes
  • Guiding Philosophies

Steps to take

Creating a list of Target Schools: D1, D2, or D3

  • There are a lot of websites that rank the colleges in order.  Check these out and determine whether you are tier one, tier two or three.
  • Research colleges by looking up Leagues and Standings
  • Consider D1 vs D2 vs D3 and which level is right for you.  
  • Check the rosters to see how you stack up.  ie this Yale Soccer Roster 
  • Ask your current club and high school coaches for feedback
  • Be Realistic  
  • Use Maia and sort your list with your King college counselor.
  • Keep in mind, there is life beyond collegiate sports, so be sure you are getting the most out of your academic experience as well. 

College Athletics Night Video

Students and their families Grade 8-12 who are interested in playing a sport in college and learning about the recruiting process, watch the video below.

Topics covered:

  • NCAA DI, DII and DIII Athletics Comparison
  • NCAA Contact Rules and Regulations
  • COVID impacts and changing landscape 
  • Athletic Scholarships vs Merit Aid
  • Exposure Timelines
  • Guiding Principles and Philosophies
  • Recruiting Process Frequently Asked Questions

Guest Speakers

  • Greta Ell - Assistant Coach, Sacred Heart University Field Hockey, University of Virginia Field Hockey Player
  • Nicholas Della Jacono (King Class of 2014) - Assistant Coach, College of the Holy Cross Football, Catholic University Football Player
  • Javier Decima - Associate Head Coach, Fairfield University Men's Soccer
  • Briana Brown (King Class of 2010) - Player Personnel Specialist, Boston College Men's Basketball, St. John's University Basketball Player, former professional basketball player

Scholarships

  • If asked do you need money, say yes early.  Coaches plan out the financial budget ahead of time.
  • Schools usually have a certain number of scholarships (12) and divide that $ up – ie –  Athletes can have a variety of percentages of scholarships (20%, 50% etc)
  • This conversation often includes parents and coaches.
  • Ivy League schools do not award athletic scholarships.
  • D3 schools do not award athletic scholarships but merit aid.  (More on that below.)
  • D2 do award athletic scholarships.

This is a helpful website on Athletic Scholarships. 

Board Scores and Academic Course Load

  • Determine around the end of sophomore year if the ACT vs SAT is right for you.  They are viewed equally, so know which one you prefer and score higher on.
  • Coaches begin asking around junior year for board scores, so think about taking it early in junior year if you can, but also know what is right for you and where you are in your curriculum (ie math level) and when it is wise to take it later.
  • Consider practice tests.  Often when coaches ask, it is helpful to know where you are scoring, even if they are practice tests.
  • Strategically take AP and Honors courses.  You want to challenge yourself, but do know when it is too much rigor.   Getting an A is sometimes more important for a recruited athlete.
  • Sometimes a coach will have a baseline requirement and can share what admissions expects to see.
  • Remember as freshman you are tracking course load for junior and senior years

How COVID-19 has changed the recruiting process?

  • The NCAA has created and extended a dead period that prohibits NCAA Div 1 coaches from recruiting. 
  • On campus visits have been prohibited and only virtual clinics occured.
  • Club sports have been paused making exposure even harder.
  • Coaches rely on video even more.
  • The NCAA has gone test optional for those students enrolling in fall 2021 and spring 2022.   Fall 2022 test policies are still to be determined.

Guiding Philosophies

  • Enjoy the process
  • Find the school that fits.  As a general rule of thumb, D3 offers a more well-rounded quality of life for the student athlete.  
  • Learn throughout.  You are competing on a global market for the first time, but find confidence and self-advocacy in that.
  • Coaches can tell if the parent is emailing, so let the child communicate.
  • Keep in mind, you have four years at a higher ed institution of learning.  Don’t waste it. You have to be happy, motivated and confident.  You are developing your young adult self. 

Contacts

Emily Prince, Assistant Director of College Counseling, eprince@kingschoolct.org

Micah Hauben, Dean of Athletics, mhauben@kingschoolct.org